Why your FB friends are checking in at Standing Rock



North Dakota oil pipeline protests

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Cousins Jessica and Michelle Decoteau, of Belcourt, both enrolled members in the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, don slogans opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline on October 29, in Bismarck, North Dakota. The pair, who participated in a peaceful protest outside the North Dakota state capitol, say they stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Dakota Access Pipeline protesters sit in a prayer circle at the Front Line Camp as a line of law enforcement officers make their way across the camp to remove the protesters and relocate to the overflow camp a few miles to the south on Highway 1806 in Morton County, North Dakota, on Thursday, October 27.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

An unidentified Dakota Access Pipeline protester is arrested inside the Front Line Camp as law enforcement surrounds the camp to remove the protesters from the property on October 27.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

On October 27, tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation to force Dakota Access Pipeline protesters off private land in Morton County, North Dakota, where they had camped to block construction.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

A Dakota Access Pipeline protester shows where he was hit by a shotgun bean bag round fired by officers trying to force protesters from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on October 27 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

JR American Horse leads a march to the Dakota Access Pipeline site in southern Morton County, North Dakota. Several hundred protesters marched about a mile up Highway 1806 on Friday, September 9, to the area of the pipeline site.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Native Americans head to a rally at the state Capitol in Denver on Thursday, September 8, to protest in solidarity with members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota over the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The tribe argues that the pipeline, which would cross four states to move oil from North Dakota to Illinois, threatens water supplies and has already disrupted sacred sites.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

People hang a sign near a sacred burial ground on September 4 that they say was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline. Proponents say the project could be an economic boon for the region.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Marlo Langdeau of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe joins hundreds of Native Americans for a march to a burial ground on September 4, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The pipeline’s developer, Energy Transfer Partners, has predicted the project would help the United States become less dependent on importing oil from unstable regions of the world.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Native Americans on September 4 march to the site of a sacred burial ground near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Those seeking to halt construction warn of an environmental disaster that would destroy sacred Native American sites.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Native Americans march to the site of a sacred burial ground on September 4. Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II said he doesn’t support moving more crude oil from North Dakota. He told CNN affiliate KFYR that Americans should look for alternative and renewable sources of energy.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Native Americans ride with raised fists to a sacred burial ground on September 4 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says the pipeline “threatens the tribe’s environmental and economic well-being, and would damage and destroy sites of great historic, religious and cultural significance to the tribe.”

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

The Missouri River is seen beyond an encampment September 4, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Flags of Native American tribes from across the United States and Canada line the entrance to a protest encampment on September 3.

North Dakota oil pipeline protests

Phil Little Thunder Sr. attends an evening gathering at an encampment on September 3.



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